Opinions

Thu
19
Feb

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson

It's snowing again. Sigh. Since we could get three more snows before  about May 1st, maybe this ol' child of Iowa, better advise all you desert rats about snow. First, don't step on it. People in snow country shovel their sidewalks so it won't pack down and make ice that might not melt until spring.  You have probably noticed that leather soled cowboy boots and lightin- the-rear pickups don't mix well with snow and ice. So wear your tennies and  load up some rocks, better yet don't drive.

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Thu
12
Feb

JUST FRIENDS

by Baxter Black

I can’t remember his number. I don’t call him often enough. His birthday always escapes me ‘cause I don’t keep up with that stuff. And I’m lucky if I see him even once or twice a year But I’m really not complainin’ ‘cause we’re still close, we’re just not near. I recognize his daughter’s voice. I remember when she was born.

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Thu
12
Feb

ONLY TEXAS TEAM CROWNED COLLEGE BASKETBALL CHAMPS

by Bartee Haile

The undefeated Miners of Texas Western gave the home crowd thrills aplenty on Feb. 14, 1966 by slipping past Arizona State 69-67 for their 19th consecutive victory. The miracle maker in El Paso was a former two-time all-state basketball star from Oklahoma. Don Haskins played college ball for Hank Iba at Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State) and like many disciples of the living legend chose coaching for a career. Haskins got his start in the Texas Panhandle with high school teams at Benjamin (1955-56), Hedley (1956-60) and Dumas (1960-61). He won 79 percent of the time, an impressive record but hardly an automatic springboard to the college level.

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Wed
04
Feb

This Week in Texas History

by Bartee Haile
On Feb. 4, 1896, three days after her drunk of a husband threatened her with a butcher knife, Matilda Brown Sweeney moved back home to Ashton Villa where she would spend the rest of her life. The story of Texas' famous first mansion begins with a New York runaway named James Moreau Brown. On his third or fourth escape attempt in the late 1830's, the adventuresome adolescent kept going, working his way across the Deep South until he landed  at Galveston during the last days of the Texas Republic. Brown, in his mid-twenties by then, arrived with money in his pockets and property to his name. With a partner he soon decided was dead weight, he opened a hardware store on Market Street in 1847.
 
Wed
04
Feb

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson

Instead of a war on poverty, how about a celebration of poverty? First of all, I'm not going to tackle REAL poverty, just American poverty. We seem to imagine the 1% in the USA as super-rich white business executives who make a profit off the backs of their employees. Well, the 1% does include a few business tycoons like Bill Gates and The Donald, but most of them are professional athletes and coaches, movie stars and singers: Oprah, Tiger Woods, LeBron James, A-Rod, and Beyoncé. According to the Wall Street Journal, "The minimum salary in all three major league sports (NFL, NBA, and MLB) is sufficient to place every player in the top 1%
 
Wed
28
Jan

This Week in Texas History

by Bartee Haile

IFranklin Roosevelt stunned his cabinet speechless on Feb. 1, 1937 by introducing a radical plan to tame the hostile Supreme Court. The vice-president was the first to speak. "Before that law comes back up here for the Boss' signature, many, many moons will pass," predicted John Nance Garner of Texas.
 

 

Wed
28
Jan

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson

I've been reading a little about how all our electronics and busy lives are causing us to feel like we need to be doing something constantly. Any lull in the activity and we start to wonder: what's wrong with me? Am I getting 
depressed? Am I useless? Will I ever be productive again? Is this ALL there is? 
 

 

Wed
21
Jan

The Little Engine That Could

by Baxter Black, DVM

Have you read The Little Engine That Could to your kids or grandkids? Dr. Tom told me a story that brought it back to me. Two good ol' Nebraska cowboys were given the task of rebuilding a barbwire fence on an 80-acre pasture. First they removed the clips and stays from the old top wire on the long side; a quarter mile long. Being a progressive outfit, they were using modern agriculture technology. They backed their pickup to the gatepost on the southeast corner of the pasture. That allowed them to hook the ranch's homemade wire winder to the free length of wire.

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Wed
21
Jan

TEXAN CROONED WHILE THE TWENTIES ROARED

by Bartee Haile

Gene Austin, the original crooner whose recordings sold 86 million copies in the Twenties and Thirties, lost his battle with lung cancer on Jan. 24, 1972. The popular singer and prolific songwriter was born Lemeul Eugene Lucas in 1900 in the north Texas town of Gainesville. He did most of his growing up near Shreveport, where his mother moved with her second husband after the death of Gene's father. Back in those days, restless boys really did run away to join the circus, and the 15 year old was among them. Finding life under the big top not all it was cracked up to be, Gene went back home but left for good a few months later. The teen talked his way into uniform by tricking a recruiter into believing he was older than he looked. He kept up the masquerade long along to take part in Gen. Pershing's pointless pursuit of Pancho Villa before getting kicked out of the army for being underage.

Thu
15
Jan

CURTAIN RISES ON "MA" FERGUSON'S SECOND ACT

by Bartee Haile
Eight years after her election as the first female governor in American history, Miriam A Ferguson returned for a second-term encore on Jan. 17, 1933. Following the impeachment and permanent banishment from public office of husband Jim in 1917, "Ma" Ferguson stepped forward to defend the family's tarnished honor. She waged a successful campaign for the statehouse seven years later but lost a 1926 reelection bid to challenger Dan Moody.
 

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