Opinions

Thu
16
Oct

AUSTIN WENT BACK AND FORTH ON SLAVERY ISSUE

by Bartee Haile
 
Col. James Fannin put his slaves up for sale on Oct. 21, 1835 in order to raise quick cash for the hard-strapped Texas Revolution. For the Georgia native and many others, Lone Star independence and the South's "peculiar institution" were sacred and inseparable causes. But that was not the case for the man now known as the "Father of Texas." Caught between the economic needs of the struggling colony and the nagging doubts of his own conscience, no one lost more sleep over the emotioncharged question of slavery than Stephen F. Austin.
 
Thu
16
Oct

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
 
Yellow seems to be fall's favorite color. OK, sure, a few reds, pinks, oranges, and even blues are sprinkled here and there, but yellow rules. Spring gets too much credit for wildflowers. I would bet, if they could be counted, more wildflowers are blooming right now than in all the months of spring. The most common are probably composites: the sunflowers or daisy types. Since they all have yellow sun-ray petals, they are often named for their centers which are actually additional clusters of small flowers: black- or browneyed Susans, golden-eyes, or ox-eyes.
 
Thu
09
Oct

CREW TALKED CAPTAIN OUT OF ABANDONING "HOUSTON"

by Bartee Haile
 
A Japanese torpedo so badly damaged the HOUSTON on the night of Oct. 13, 1944 that the captain of the light cruiser gave the order to "abandon ship." The first but soon forgotten U.S. naval vessel to bear the name of the Bayou City was a German cargo carrier seized during the First World War. The second was a heavy cruiser christened in 1929 by the daughter of a former mayor of Texas' biggest town.
 
Thu
09
Oct

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
 
Every year politicians spend billions of dollars on our elections, but with the result that fewer and fewer people actually vote. One recent article in the Washington Post said only "15% of the voting age population cast ballots - - or 18.2 million people out of 122.8 million eligible." The highest turnout ever was in 1966 when a dismal 32 percent voted. It is equally true in both parties and at the national and local levels.
 
Wed
01
Oct

OLD RIP FORD WAS THE TEXANS' TEXAN

Accused of meddling in the internal affairs of neighboring Mexico, Rip Ford and his company of hard-riding, hard-fighting Texas Rangers were mustered out of federal service on Oct. 2, 1851. For the incomparably versatile figure, who won high praise as everything a real Texan should be, the furlough was nothing more than a much deserved opportunity to catch his breath. Fellow Texans would need him again, and he always answered the call.
 
Wed
01
Oct

Hey Mom, we need to talk . . .

JEFF DAVIS COUNTY and WEST TEXAS - Discussing aging issues, such as living arrangements, finances, dating, end-of-life decisions and driving, early and often can save families years of heartache, tension and even legal battles. Yet, research indicates that about two-thirds of American families put off these conversations, either because they are uncomfortable with the topics or they just don't know where to start.
 
Wed
24
Sep

POLICE CHIEF GOES OVER TO THE DARK SIDE

After 13 months on the run, a former small-town police chief wanted for murder and armed robbery was captured in Tennessee on Sep. 27, 1929. Had Tom Shook always been a crooked cop concealing his crimes behind a badge? If that was true, he sure had fooled a bunch of people during his eight-year career in law enforcement with different departments in North Texas. And the town council in Electra, the Red River boomtown northwest of Wichita Falls, would not had hired him as the new chief of police had he not come highly recommended.
 
Wed
24
Sep

Switchin' Flies

My grandma once gave me a box of her handwritten recipes. They quickly became a treasure. Grandma Bess was an old Iowa farm wife who raised and preserved everything her family ate except coffee, sugar, and white flour. They ground corn at the mill in town into cornmeal, but didn't raise wheat. They raised and butchered their own chickens, hogs, and calves, and milked several cows.
Thu
18
Sep

BIG-LEAGUE PITCHER HAS REMARKABLE ROOKIE RUN

by Bartee Haile.
 
With his suddenly famous fiancée watching from the grandstand on Sep. 17, 1934, Lynwood "Schoolboy" Rowe kept his winning streak alive by pitching a near-perfect shut-out against the Washington Senators. The Waco native and son of a trapeze artist was 23, when the Tigers brought him up from their Beaumont farm team in 1933. The lanky six-foot four-inch hurler passed his major-league test winning seven and losing four in 15 starts, a respectable showing on a so-so club that finished fifth in the American League.
 
Thu
18
Sep

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson.
 
Mountains disappearing into foggy, low-hanging clouds always signals fall. Fog is my favorite weather….well maybe second to rain. I used to have a three woodstove lids hanging in my kitchen that I had painted with a saying I liked: "If a man looks out his window and sees another man's house, he is a poor man." For quite a few years of my life I never could see anyone else's house from my windows. Today, even though now I own my own house, I feel poorer, but on foggy days, I can be rich again.
 

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