Opinions

Thu
11
Sep

TEXANS TAKE PART IN LAST OKLAHOMA LAND RUSH

The official starter fired his pistol on Sep. 16, 1893, and thousands of land-hungry Americans, including a slew of eager Texans, were off and running for the Cherokee Outlet! Seventy-four years earlier, the federal government initiated eviction proceedings against the Five Civilized Tribes from their ancestral grounds in the southeastern United States
 
Thu
11
Sep

On The Edge of Common Sense

BEWARE CONNOISSEURS! A new discovery may change the way America eats! Love your broccoli? Savor your home-grown tomatoes? Would give your eye-teeth for a blueberry pie?  This discovery could create sweeping protests and black markets like marijuana has never seen! PLANTS FEEL PAIN! That’s right, PLANTS FEEL PAIN!
 
Thu
04
Sep

Switchin' Flies

By Barney Nelson.
 
An old cowboy friend, Tommy Vaughn, once explained that colts and kids had to be taught to work, it didn't come naturally. I remember my brother's high school football coach's winning strategy. Under his coaching, we often won (11, or second 16) the state championship at the top 5A level in Arizona. With temperatures in the 114-degree range at the beginning of fall practice, the Arizona desert was not an easy place to coach football.

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Thu
04
Sep

OUTLAW TOO SMART FOR HIS OWN GOOD

By Bartee Haile.
 
On Sep. 4, 1881, Isaac "Ike" Stockton turned in a member of his own gang for the murder of a Colorado lawman and collected a sizeable reward for the back-stabbing betrayal. Born too late to fight in the War Between the States, the Stockton boys grew up on a ranch in north Texas. Ike had a head on his shoulders, which made him even more dangerous than younger brother Port, the trigger-happy type who never tired of killing.

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Thu
28
Aug

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
 
Does anyone remember Sheriff Jim Skinner? I know James Dyer does. I do too. I arrived in West Texas in 1968, toward the end of Skinner's reign as a Brewster County Sheriff. I knew him mostly by reputation, but I did witness his effect on crowd control a few times.
 
Thu
28
Aug

NEWSPAPERMAN WRITES POLITICAL BEST-SELLER

On Aug. 28, 1959 a book reviewer had nothing but the highest praise for a newspaperman's first novel: "It may be a long time before a better one comes along." Allen Stuart Drury was born in Houston during the First World War and grew up in a small California town. After earning his degree in journalism from Stanford, the cub reporter's first job was on a weekly paper, where in 1940 he won a national award for editorial writing.
 
Thu
21
Aug

TEXAS CONFEDERATES RIDE INTO MEXICAN EXILE

by Bartee Haile
 
Two Confederate generals sat down with Emperor Maximilian on Aug. 24, 1865 and presented their bold plan for keeping the Austrian puppet on the Mexican throne. The battle-scarred cavalrymen of the famed Iron Brigade pent the last weeks of the Civil War guarding Little Rock against an attack that never came. When confirmation of Lee's surrender finally filtered through the lines, Gen. Jo Shelby fell back to Texas to await further orders.
 
Thu
21
Aug

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
 
I have the world's smartest grandson. No, really! Most grandmothers just THINK their grandson is smart, but mine really is. He even wears a t-shirt that says something like, "Those of you who think you know it all are annoying to those of us who do." Consequently, he usually just rolls his eyes at his goofy granny, but once in a while he treats me like a fellow adult, and we actually have a conversation. A few nights ago, that happened. 
 
Thu
14
Aug

Switchin' Flies

By Barney Nelson.
 
People are enchanted by low light. It seems romantic, exotic, mysterious. It's also cheap. I've been reading a book, "The End of Night" by Paul Bogard. One of his most profound ideas is that people often say dark skies only benefit astronomers, but that is like saying the Grand Canyon only benefits geologists. He says kids are growing up who have never seen the Big Dipper or even the moon because cities are so garishly lit. He says light pollution is expensive and wasteful, harming our birds, our mental and physical health, our sleep, and our ability to think.

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Thu
14
Aug

TEXAN LOSES TEMPER ONE TIME TOO MANY

By Bartee Haile.
 
David S. Terry, a Texas expatriate with a red-hot temper, ran into a Supreme Court justice on Aug. 14, 1889 and gave his mortal enemy a piece of his mind and the back of his hand. The younger brother of Benjamin F. Terry, famous founder of Terry's Texas Rangers, went West after seeing action in the Mexican War. But the pick-and-shovel routine in the California gold field was not for the gifted attorney, and he turned to practicing law.

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