Opinions

Wed
18
Dec

WEST TEXAS CHRISTMAS STORIES

By Tumbleweed Smith.

Wed
11
Dec

Switchin' Flies

By Barney Nelson.

Wed
11
Dec

ERRATIC LAMAR NEVER LIVED UP TO HIS POTENTIAL

By Bartee Haile.

Thu
05
Dec

Switchin' Flies

By Barney Nelson.

Thu
05
Dec

MEXICAN INVADERS MARCH CAPTIVES TO PEROTE PRISON

By Bartee Haile.
When Mexico City came into view on Dec. 5, 1842, five dozen exhausted and starving Texans dared to hope their three-month march from San Antonio was over at last. Since the release six months earlier of the last members of the Santa Fe Expedition, the infamous stone fortress called Perote had stood empty. But once again its dank dungeons would hold hostages from Texas joined in the near future by 150 more. The poor wretches, who crowded into the rat-infested cells of Perote, were the human trophies of a surprise raid on San Antonio. The Mexicans might not be able to reclaim the land lost at San Jacinto, but they could still make life miserable for the winners.
Wed
27
Nov

Black’s Hambletonian

By Baxter Black, DVM.

Wed
27
Nov

The Texas Trail of Fame

By Tumbleweed Smith.

Thu
21
Nov

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
 
During fall migration, which is happening now, the buzzards leave and the red-tails return. I'm sort of a semi-casual birdwatcher, so I provide a small pan of water year around for critters, mostly birds. I keep a Peterson's Guide handy to try to identify them, but I also like to read deaper. "The Bedside Book of Birds" is perfect: a collection of great art and great literature about birds that can be read a page or two at a time while getting sleepy. It was collected by Graeme Gibson, one of those tweed coat, tweed vest, and tweed hat kind of guys who considers himself a gentleman of the highest order. He uses words like predilection, entrée, fortunate, and omnipresent. So this is not a book intended to be read by people with a predilection for dirty hands, even though the author's first name looks like it ought to be pronounced Grimey. But I like it anyway.
Thu
21
Nov

"LITTLE PHIL" MADE LIFE MISERABLE FOR CONQUERED TEXANS

by Bartee Haile
 
The dictatorship of Gen. Philip Sheridan in occupied Texas officially ended on Nov. 29, 1867 four months after the president sent the pipsqueak packing. Celebrity status in the North, the product of a popular poem that exaggerated his exploits, and a cozy relationship with Gen. U.S. Grant gave "Little Phil," who stopped growing at five feet five inches, free rein over the conquered Confederate states of Texas and Louisiana. Absolute authority allowed him to indulge his battle-hardened prejudices against secessionists.

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Wed
13
Nov
admin's picture

Switchin' Flies

By Barney Nelson.
Thanksgiving used to be my favorite holiday. My little family-or maybe I insisted-started a tradition of camping out and cooking dinner on a fire. We went to different places, but always a beautiful one. Sometimes we packed everything in panniers and did it all horseback, sometimes we loaded everything into a pick-up. The weather was usually beautiful, especially with a fire to keep off the chill, but sometimes it rained, snowed, or the wind blew. No matter-Thanksgiving meant picnic and camping. I would start preparing several days ahead by buying a small smoked turkey and cooking it a little longer until it was falling off the bone. Then I'd bone it and divide into three or four packages, wrapped in a couple of layers of heavy tinfoil, so I could lay them in coals.

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