Opinions

Thu
31
Oct
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THE FLESH-AND-BLOOD DEALEY BEHIND DALLAS' PLAZA

by Bartee Haile
 
Nov. 4, 1940 was "Dealey Day" at the University of Texas as "Mr. G.B.," founder and guiding genius of the Dallas Morning News, was honored with a testimonial banquet by the journalism department. Seventy years earlier, George Bannerman Dealey walked down the gangplank at Galveston with his English family. Forced by adverse economic circumstances to seek a promising place for a fresh start, the Dealeys chose Texas over New York.
 

 

Thu
24
Oct
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AMISH RECYCING

By Baxter Black, DVM.

Thu
24
Oct
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ANOTHER HONOR FOR QUAIL

By Tumbleweed Smith.
Wed
16
Oct
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Commentary

Voters begin going to the polls Monday to decide the fate of public schools in Fort Davis. We can't urge our fellow residents in any stronger terms than this: it's never easy to impose a tax on yourself, but this is one of those times when our choices are so few that each of us must step up and vote for doing just that - giving more of our dollars to help keep our schools working. We read with interest what our old friend Harold Pattillo had to say in his letter last week. If you missed it, he was concerned that our school board had not been doing enough to cut expenses in the face of the loss of state funds - which have hit every school district across the state.
Wed
16
Oct
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SAM HOUSTON SWORN IN A MONTH AHEAD OF SCHEDULE

By Bartee Haile.
Caving into public pressure, David G. Burnet abruptly resigned as head of the temporary government on Oct. 22, 1836, making it possible for Sam Houston to be sworn in that same day as the first president of the Lone Star Republic. Mirabeau Lamar, who despised the Hero of San Jacinto every bit as much as his friend Burnet, grumbled, "That little month Houston could not wait." But popular impatience rather than the general's agenda was responsible for the lame duck's exit four weeks ahead of schedule. Texans were in a hurry for Houston to take the reins and go about the business of running the country.
Thu
10
Oct
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TURTLE TROUBLE

by Baxter Black, DVM
 
What do horses, centipedes, geese, dogs and zippers have in common with Mike Tyson? They bite! As a veterinarian I routinely find myself sticking my hand into some animal's mouth, giving pills, floating teeth, removing foreign objects or tickling their uvula. Not long ago I plunged my arm in a cow's mouth (she was in a chute) to confirm my diagnosis of "rattlesnake bite on the torus linguae (dorsal hump) of her tongue."
 
Thu
10
Oct
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U.S. GOVERNMENT SMUGGLED NAZI SCIENTISTS INTO TEXAS

By Oct. 12, 1945, roughly a month after the president approved the top-secret Project Paperclip, the United States Army started smuggling a very different kind of illegal alien across the Mexican border into El Paso. Meanwhile, many thousands of Lone Star soldiers, sailors and marines waited in Europe and the Pacific for their turn to come home. How would these weary warriors have felt had they known the brains behind the Third Reich's war machine were beating them back to Texas?
 
Thu
03
Oct
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A Diesel Wreck

by Baxter Black, DVM.

It’s been said, “Free advice is always worth more than advice you have to pay for.” Barb said she remembered a time when farmers used what we call today “alternative medicine” on themselves and their animals. They had lots of uncles, medicine men and quacks to seek advice from. One gave himself a cow dose of penicillin and another one poured Coppertox on a sore. They both survived. Then there was the story from the old days, about the two brothers whose dad bought a 700-lb Brahma bull at the sale in Eau Claire. On arrival at the farm, Dad diagnosed that the critter had lice. Lots of us save our used motor oil for a variety of uses; on the gravel drive, painting corrals, warts or cat repulser. He told the boys to “oil him down.”
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Thu
03
Oct
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ROBERT LEE’S FIRST GAME IN THE NEW STADIUM

By Tumbleweed Smith.

Mon
30
Sep
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AMPUTATED LIMB GAVE SANTA ANNA A LEG UP

Back in business after the disgrace at San Jacinto, Santa Anna oversaw the bizarre burial of his own amputated leg on Sep. 27, 1842. For the third-rate Napoleon, not even a grotesque funeral for a shriveled limb was too crude a gimmick if it helped him stay in power.
 
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