Opinions

Thu
30
Apr

On The Edge of Common Sense

Why is it that we know couples that beg the question, “What does she see in him?” I’m not going to use names for the sake of privacy. I can’t actually say ‘to protect the innocent’. I’m just going to use the aliasi of Geraldo and Lucinda. I was on the phone with one of my good friends, Geraldo Uno. He had thrown a team roping party and asked our mutual friend, Geraldo Dos to come and help. “He’s the best there is at what he does.”
 
Thu
30
Apr

FORGOTTEN SIDEKICK NEVER ESCAPED THE KID'S SHADOW

Henry Brown laughed under his breath as he rode through a heavy downpour into Medicine Lodge, Kansas on May 1, 1884. What a beautiful day for a bank robbery! The driving rain would keep nosy townspeople indoors while he and his accomplices looted the vault at
their leisure.
 
Thu
23
Apr

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
A few weeks ago I wrote about wildflowers, but since then more have popped open. Maybe the prettiest new one is the yellow evening primrose. The most numerous and best smelling is scarlet gaura or scarlet beeblossom. The tiny, delicate honeysuckle-like flowers cluster on a tall spike and begin blooming from the bottom. They start out white, then fade to pink, then to red.
 
Thu
16
Apr

This Week in Texas History

In April 1934, a year after pari-mutuel horse racing became legal,  Texas' fourth track opened in San Antonio under the name of Alamo Downs. Horse races and wagers on the outcome were common in the Lone Star State as far back as the middle of the nineteenth century. Before the Civil War, fans flocked to the Hill Country hamlet of Harkeyville to place their bets. When the American love affair with the thoroughbred blossomed in the 1880's, new courses sprang up at Dallas and Brownwood. Following the example of many other states, Texas exempted horse racing from the anti-gambling statutes in 1905. For four frenzied years, race tracks drew big crowds until scandals back east soured the public on the popular pastime  
 
Thu
16
Apr

Eva House of the DMR dies on April 7 in Alpine

FORT DAVIS - Eva G. House, born on April 26, 1915, died on April 7, 2015, in Alpine after a brief illness.  She lived in the Davis Mountains Resort near Fort Davis. She is survived by her son, Sam House who lives in the DMR and two other sons, located in North Carolina and Utah, as well as two brothers and two sisters, seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.  
 
Thu
09
Apr

RECORD STRENGTH TORNADO TEARS THROUGH THE PANHANDLE

The only F5 tornado ever to touch down in the northernmost part of the Lone Star State tore through the Texas Panhandle on Apr. 9, 1947 leaving death and destruction in its 100-mile-long wake.
 
Thu
09
Apr

Commentary

Whether it's another wildfire or one of those crippling ice storms, one of  the certainties in Far West Texas has always been the response of the folks at West Texas Utilities to do everything they can to get us all back up and  running as quickly as possible
 
Thu
02
Apr

"RAGTIME KING" LEFT UNIQUE MUSICAL LEGACY

by Bartee Haile
 
When Scott Joplin died in a New York City asylum on Apr. 1, 1917, the "King of Ragtime" was out of money and out of his mind. Florence Joplin, a freeborn black woman from Kentucky, gave birth to the second of her six children in late 1867 or early 1868 near Linden in northeastern Texas.
 
Thu
02
Apr

Commentary

Thanks to all the volunteers and members of the Fort Davis, Marfa and Davis Mountains Resort fire departments - again, more volunteers - who shut down the Poor Farm fire in short order this weekend. It's one more reminder, however, that despite all the rains this winter and spring, the country is still very dry and very susceptible to going up in flames.
 
Thu
26
Mar

Switchin' Flies

by Barney Nelson
 
Have you noticed the difference between national news and our boring rural hayseed newspaper? I say it's high time Editor Dillard jacked up the excitement level around here. All we need are some better headlines and a few exclamation points!!! I can help with that.
 

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